Dr. Ginger Rebstock

Center paper finalist for Cozzarelli Prize

The paper “Climate presses and pulses mediate the decline of a migratory predator”,” published last year ” is the finalist for the Cozzarelli Prize in the category Class VI: Applied Biological, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Congrats to former Abrahms Lab postdoc Dr.T. J. Clark-Wolf, Dr. Dee Boersma, Dr. Ginger A. Rebstock, and Dr. Briana Abrahms! Read the full press release on the PNAS website.

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Sex-specific migratory behavior in a marine predator results in higher risks to females

Metadata Authors: Dr. Ginger Rebstock and Dr. P Dee BoersmaJournal: Marine Ecology Press SeriesDOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/meps14476 Summary Summary written by Sofia Denkovski Protecting Migratory Species Sexual Segregation of Magellanic Penguins Effects of sex-biased distribution on females What does this tell us?

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Climate presses and pulses mediate the decline of a migratory predator

Authors: T. J. Clark-Wolf, P. Dee Boersma, Ginger A. Rebstock, and Briana AbrahmsJournal: Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesDOI: 10.1073/pnas.2209821120 Long-term climate changes and extreme climate events differentially impact animal populations, yet whether and why these processes may act synergistically or antagonistically remains unknown…

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Making a perfect penguin_orig

Site fidelity increases reproductive success by increasing foraging efficiency in a marine predator

Authors: Ginger A Rebstock, Briana Abrams, P. Dee BoersmaJournal: Behavioral EcologyDOI: 10.1093/beheco/arac052 Seabirds must find food efficiently in the dynamic ocean environment to succeed at raising chicks. In theory, site familiarity, gained by prior experience in a place, should increase foraging efficiency when prey is predictable, and translate into increased reproductive success, though this is difficult to test empirically…

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