Papers

The value of field research in academia

Authors: Kasim Rafiq, Neil R. Jordan, J. Weldon McNutt, John Neelo, Nina Attias, Dee Boersma, Meredith S. Palmer, Jennifer Ruesink, and Briana AbrahmsJournal: ScienceDOI: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.ado6937 “By refining the academic system to recognize and support different forms of scientific inquiry equally, we can build the diverse research community necessary to empower discovery across disciplines.”

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A fearful scourge to the penguin colonies: Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) predation on living Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) may be more common than assumed

Authors: Dr. Ginger Rebstock and Dr. P Dee BoersmaJournal: Marine Ecology Press SeriesDOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/meps14476 Excerpt from abstract: Southern giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus) are important consumers that range across the oceans throughout the southern hemisphere […] Here we describe a predation attempt by a trio of southern giant petrels on a molting adult Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) at the large colony at Punta Tombo, Argentina […] We suggest that living penguins—both fledglings and adults—may constitute a more seasonally significant proportion of the giant petrel diet than previously assumed, and their capture may represent a specialized predation technique.

A fearful scourge to the penguin colonies: Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) predation on living Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) may be more common than assumed Read More »

Hunting mode and habitat selection mediate the success of human hunters

Authors: Kaitlyn M. Gaynor, Alex McInturff, Briana L. Abrahms, Alison M. Smith & Justin S. BrasharesJournal: Movement EcologyDOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40462-024-00471-z Abstract Excerpt: “Our study indicates that hunters can successfully employ a diversity of harvest strategies, and that hunting success is mediated by the interacting effects of hunting mode and landscape features. Such results highlight the breadth of human hunting modes, even within a single hunting technique, and lend insight into the varied ways that humans exert predation pressure on wildlife.” Photo credit by FieldsportsChannel.tv – https://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldsportschannel/39148108202/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=82827895

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Sex-specific migratory behavior in a marine predator results in higher risks to females

Metadata Authors: Dr. Ginger Rebstock and Dr. P Dee BoersmaJournal: Marine Ecology Press SeriesDOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/meps14476 Summary Summary written by Sofia Denkovski Protecting Migratory Species Sexual Segregation of Magellanic Penguins Effects of sex-biased distribution on females What does this tell us?

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Increasing ambient temperatures trigger shifts in activity patterns and temporal partitioning in a large carnivore guild

Authors: Kasim Rafiq, Neil R. Jordan, Krystyna Golabek, John W. McNutt, Alan Wilsonand, Briana AbrahmsJournal: Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological SciencesDOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2023.1938 Shifts in species’ interactions are implicated as an important proximate cause underpinning climate-change-related extinction. However, there is little empirical evidence on the pathways through which climate conditions, such as ambient temperature, impact community dynamics… Photo credit: Krystyna Jordan

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Changing course: Relocating commercial tanker lanes significantly reduces threat of chronic oiling for a top marine predator

Metadata Authors: Eric L. Wagner, Esteban Frere, P. Dee BoersmaJournal: Marine Pollution BulletinDOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.11 Summary Summary written by Sofia Denkovski Argentinian oil and effects on seabirds Surveys from 1982-1990 suggested more than 40,000 penguins died per year in Chubut and Santa Cruz from chronic oiling. This was hypothesized to be due to the colonies’ proximity to oil centers and shipping lanes. Why is oil so bad for birds? Oiled birds lose their ability to thermoregulate and can ingest the toxic oil. Penguins are especially vulnerable due to remote breeding sites and inability to fly. Changes after establishment of 1997 marine

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Chasing inter-species communication: what marine mammals are telling us about our oceans

Authors: Sue E MooreJournal: ICES Journal of Marine ScienceDOI: 0.1093/icesjms/fsad030 I describe my path through a series of opportunities that provided stepping stones from childhood years in the landlocked US Midwest to a 45-year-long career focused on cetacean behaviour and ecology…

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Divergent foraging strategies between populations of sympatric matrilineal killer whales

Authors: Jennifer B Tennessen, Marla M Holt, Brianna M Wright, M Bradley Hanson, Candice K Emmons, Deborah A Giles, Jeffrey T Hogan, Sheila J Thornton, Volker B DeeckeJournal: Behavioral EcologyDOI: 10.1093/beheco/arad002Coverage: The Seattle Times, Skagit Valley Herald, Seattle King 5 News, KUOW Public Radio, Oregon Public Broadcasting’s “Think Out Loud”, Victoria Times Colonist, North Shore News

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Photo credit: Scott Pearson of WDFW

Resilience to a severe marine heatwave at two Pacific seabird colonies

Authors: Eric L. Wagner, Scott F. Pearson, Thomas P. Good, Peter J. Hodum, Eric R. Buhle, Michael B. SchrimpfJournal: Marine Ecology Progress SeriesDOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/meps14222 A severe marine heat wave (MHW) persisted in the California Current ecosystem from 2014 through 2016… Photo credit: Scott Pearson of WDFW

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A blue whale underwater

Climate change as a global amplifier of human–wildlife conflict

Authors: Briana Abrahms, Neil H. Carter, T. J. Clark-Wolf, Kaitlyn M. Gaynor, Erik Johansson, Alex McInturff, Anna C. Nisi, Kasim Rafiq & Leigh WestJournal: Nature Climate ChangeDOI: 10.1038/s41558-023-01608-5Coverage: KUOW, NPR, The Guardian, Newsweek, Scientific American Climate change and human–wildlife conflict are both pressing challenges for biodiversity conservation and human well-being in the Anthropocene…

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